Stress Relief
Efficacy of frequent mantra repetition on stress, quality of life, and spiritual well-being. | Print |  E-mail
Monday, 13 March 2006

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Nurses from San Diego State University research the efficacy and feasibility of teaching mantra repetition to veterans in order to impact stress, anxiety, anger, quality of life, and spiritual well-being.

Researchers from San Diego State University looked at the efficacy of repeating a mantra for reducing stress and stress-related symptoms. The authors tested the feasibility and efficacy of a 5-week (90-min per week) intervention on mantram repetition in a sample of ambulatory veterans.

 
Mindfulness-based stress reduction in relation to quality of life, mood, stress and cortisol levels. | Print |  E-mail
Monday, 06 February 2006

Researchers at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Canada studied the effects on early stage breast and prostate cancer patients of a mindfulness-based stress reduction meditation program, on quality of life, mood states.

Researchers at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Canada studied the effects on early stage breast and prostate cancer patients of a mindfulness-based stress reduction meditation program, investigating its impact on quality of life, mood states, stress symptoms, and levels of cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) and melatonin.

 
Effects of occupational stress on immunological function, glucose and blood lipid of female workers | Print |  E-mail
Monday, 16 January 2006

A study out of Xinjiang Medical University in China shows that occupational stress increases blood sugar in a group of female oil field workers, but not cholesterol.

Researchers from the Department of Occupational Health at Xinjiang Medical University in China studied the effects of occupational stress on immunological function, glucose, and blood lipid levels of female workers.

Occupational role, personal strain, and personal abilities were assessed in 900 female workers working in an oil-field setting (the observation group) and in 220 female workers in other occupational settings (controls).

 
Longitudinal impact of mindfulness meditation on illness burden in solid-organ transplant recipients | Print |  E-mail
Monday, 12 December 2005
Researchers from the University of Minnesota enrolled 20 solid-organ transplant recipients in an 8-week course of mindfulness-based stress reduction training and a gentle form of hatha yoga. Subjects were also given audiotapes for home practice and maintained practice diaries to track their participation.

At 6 months data was analyzed for impact on symptom management, illness intrusion and transplant-related stressors. Significant improvements were found in the quality and duration of sleep, and on self-reported measures of anxiety and depression.
 
Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for distress associated with tinnitus. | Print |  E-mail
Monday, 29 March 2004
Researchers from Sweden’s Uppsala University demonstrate in a randomized, clinical trial that annoyance from tinnitus (ringing in the ears) can be significantly reduced through cognitive behavioral therapy that is delivered to subjects through the Internet.
 
Cardiac coherence: a new, noninvasive measure of autonomic nervous system order. | Print |  E-mail
Friday, 15 August 2003

Tiller, McCraty and Atkinson of the Institute of HeartMath found that subjects who were trained to use a heart-focused stress-reduction technique that shifted their attention away from stress and toward their hearts, while focusing on feelings of love, caring and appreciation, showed evidence of increased cardiac coherence and stability. This supports the imagery methodology we''ve been using on many of our tapes.

Citation: Tiller WA, McCraty R, Atkinson M. Cardiac coherence: a new, noninvasive measure of autonomic nervous system order. Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine. 1996 Jan;2(1):52-65.

 
Stress management and exercise training in cardiac patients with myocardial ischemia. | Print |  E-mail
Friday, 15 August 2003

Stress management and exercise training in cardiac patients with myocardial ischemia: effects on prognosis and evaluation of mechanisms.

A placebo controlled, randomized study by J.A. Blumenthal et al, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, 1997; 157: 2213-2223, (called Stress Management and Exercise Training in Cardiac Patients with Myocardial Ischemia: Effects on Prognosis and Evaluation of Mechanisms) showed that teaching stress reduction techniques to cardiac patients reduced their risk of having further heart problems by a whopping 75%. Of 107 patients, 40 received standard medical care; 34 additionally engaged in vigorous exercise for 35 minutes, 3 times a week for 16 weeks; and 33 additionally were given weekly group sessions where they learned relaxation and stress reduction techniques (education, progressive muscle relaxation, biofeedback, thought-stopping, anger management). Results: 30% of the standard care group had additional heart problems; 21% in the exercise group; and only 10% in the stress management group.

Citation: Blumenthal JA, et al. Stress management and exercise training in cardiac patients with myocardial ischemia: effects on prognosis and evaluation of mechanisms. Archives of Internal Medicine. 1997(157):2213-2223.

 
Evaluation of a wellness-based mindfulness stress reduction intervention: a controlled trial. | Print |  E-mail
Friday, 15 August 2003

Williams, Kolar, Reger and Pearson from the Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University, ran clinical trials to see whether an 8-week, group-facilitated, Jon Kabat-Zinn-styled, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program could decrease daily stress and medical symptoms in 103 adults. (See our Practitioners We Love page for more about Jon K-Z.)

 
Stress management training of elderly patients with congestive heart failure. | Print |  E-mail
Friday, 15 August 2003

A controlled pilot study of stress management training of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

Researchers at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention evaluated the effects of stress management on the quality of life, functional capacity, and heart rate variability in a pilot study of 33 elderly patients with New York Heart Association class I-III congestive heart failure. Subjects were randomized to one of two treatment groups or a wait-listed control group. The 14 participants who completed the treatment attended eight training sessions during a 10-week period. The training consisted of 75-minute sessions adapted from the Freeze-Frame stress management program developed by the Institute of HeartMath. (This is a very simple and easy to use formula for stress relief, using relaxation and imagery.) Subjects were assessed at baseline and again at the completion of the training. Depression, stress management, optimism, anxiety, emotional distress, and functional capacity were evaluated, as well as heart rate variability. Significant improvements (p<0.05) were noted in perceived stress, emotional distress, 6-minute walk, and depression, and positive trends were noted in each of the other psychosocial measures. The 24-hour heart rate variability showed no significant changes in autonomic tone. The authors noted that CHF patients were willing study participants and their emotional coping and functional capacity were enhanced. They concluded that this program offered a simple and cost-effective way to augment medical management of CHF. Given the incompleteness of CHF medical management and the exploding interest in complementary medical intervention, they recommended that further work in psychosocial treatment be undertaken.

Citation: Luskin F, Reitz M, Newell K, Quinn TG, Haskell W. A controlled pilot study of stress management training of elderly patients with congestive heart failure. Preventive Cardiology 2002 Fall; Issue 5 (Volume 4): pp. 168-72.

 
Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on injury and illness among competitive athletes. | Print |  E-mail
Friday, 15 August 2003

Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on injury and illness among competitive athletes: a randomized clinical trial.

In previous research, cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) has been found to reduce fatigue, depression, and cortisol response to heavy exercise training among competitive collegiate athletes, and to speed physical and psychological recovery from surgery. This study assessed the efficacy of a CBSM program to reduce the frequency of injury and illness among competitive, collegiate rowers in a randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical trial. A multi-disciplinary team of researchers from the Division of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine, the Department of Psychology, University of Miami, and the Department of Exercise Physiology, West Virginia University collaborated on this study. Following the assessment of baseline medical history, mood state, stress, cortisol, sleep, alcohol use, and exercise training, collegiate rowers were stratified by gender and competitive level, and randomly assigned to either a control group or a CBSM group. Exercise training information and psychosocial assessments were repeated immediately following the intervention period. Health care providers who were blinded to whether the participant was in the intervention group or the control group recorded the frequency of medical visits and the number of days the athlete was either injured or ill throughout the season. The study found that athletes randomly assigned to a CBSM group experienced significant reductions in the number of illness and injury days, as compared to control group athletes. CBSM participants also had half the number of health service visits as did controls. The data suggest that a time-limited CBSM intervention designed specifically for an athlete population may be an effective prophylactic treatment to reduce the incidence of injury and illness among competitive collegiate athletes.

Citation: Perna FM, Antoni MH, Baum A, Gordon P, Schneiderman N. Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on injury and illness among competitive athletes: a randomized clinical trial. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2003 Winter; 25 (1): pp. 66-73.

 
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